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David Ragan could save your life

Fri May 17, 2013 12:47 pm

I couldn't pick Ragan out of crowd, but his sponsorship for All Star weekend has me being a fan.

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Now if only the following people had been David Ragan fans
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/loca ... 2935.story
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/loca ... 3084.story
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013 ... hwest-line
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/loca ... 4832.story

And that is just from Chicago in the last month :(

In 2012, there were 1,953 train-vehicle collisions, with 270 fatalities.

Re: David Ragan could save your life

Fri May 17, 2013 3:44 pm

Very cool. My step-sister and her daughter lost her husband/father to this very thing about 25 years ago up near South Bend, IN. Anyone who knows the area near Elkhart knows how many trains roll through the area and people become a little complacent and aggressive around them because of their frequency.
He was with a friend when the guy decided to race a train up to the crossroad and beat it across. The guy driving lived. He tried to do some right by her and started a college fund for her daughter and helped financially if she ever needed it, but understandably, he was never the same.
Thanks for the post HT.

Re: David Ragan could save your life

Fri May 17, 2013 8:09 pm

Why do people feel like the have to out run a train...when we lived in Illinois so many took the dare: some lived......most didn't! Mostly kids, so sad :( ........Great logo on David's car!

Re: David Ragan could save your life

Fri May 17, 2013 9:29 pm

I'm guessing that most of the crossings don't have those "arms" that block the tracks? Where I live most all of the crossings have the signals with the arms that come down across the roads before the train gets there. But, even with that, I've seen some try to squeeze through. Stupid is as stupid does...

Re: David Ragan could save your life

Sat May 18, 2013 12:08 am

Rochelle wrote:I'm guessing that most of the crossings don't have those "arms" that block the tracks? Where I live most all of the crossings have the signals with the arms that come down across the roads before the train gets there. But, even with that, I've seen some try to squeeze through. Stupid is as stupid does...


Sadly people continue to ignore crossing arms and drive around them. Then there are the people whostop on railroad tracks because someone is in front of them. A psrade float in texas last year stopped on the tracks and was hit, killing several people.

Re: David Ragan could save your life

Sat May 18, 2013 10:44 am

Most states it is now a law to have the crossing arms, but they can still get around them.

Re: David Ragan could save your life

Sat May 18, 2013 1:22 pm

Elkhart is unique.
A lot of the area is rural surrounding it and South Bend. There are many crossings that don't even have a red light, much less arms...just the old white X, stating Rail Road Crossing on it. The first passenger train rolled through the city in 1852. My great-great-great Grandfather worked on the railroad as it was built. This is THE line that brings trains into Chicago and west, from the east.
http://local2053.twu.org/default.asp?contentID=638
Here's one shot of it. I know it had a turntable too, but can't find an image.
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The famed B&O passed to the south about 20 miles or so. There are just trains and rails everywhere! :)
The National New York Central Railroad Museum, is located in Elkhart. The New York Central was once the second-largest railroad in the United States, with 11,000 route miles of track in eleven states and two Canadian provinces. New York Central's Robert R. Young Yard (now Norfolk Southern Railway's Elkhart Yard) is the largest railroad freight classification yard east of the Mississippi River.
I can't find the numbers now, but trains pass through the city something like every 25 minutes. I remember growing up how you could rarely go for a drive and not have to stop for a train. Now you may understand why people are willing to take chances. Most of them are moving pretty slow, but one mistake in timing...you won't be taking chances any more.
Tie ALWAYS goes to the train.
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